Category: Moon

humanoidhistory:

humanoidhistory:

On the set of Destination Moon, 1950. Photo by Allan Grant.

NASA Secures First International Partnership f…

NASA Secures First International Partnership for Lunar Gateway:

The following is a statement from NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine on the announcement Thursday by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau about Canada’s support for the Gateway lunar outpost and deep space exploration:

Wide Field View of Great American Eclipse

Wide Field View of Great American Eclipse

starwalkapp:Lunar Eclipses: What Are They &amp…

starwalkapp:

Lunar Eclipses: What Are They & When Is the Next One?⠀

Lunar eclipses occur when Earth’s shadow blocks the sun’s light, which otherwise reflects off the moon. There are three types — total, partial and penumbral — with the most dramatic being a total lunar eclipse, in which Earth’s shadow completely covers the moon. The next lunar eclipse will be a total lunar eclipse on Jan. 21, 2019 and will be visible from North and South America, Europe and Africa. ⠀

A lunar eclipse can occur only at full moon. A total lunar eclipse can happen only when the sun, Earth and moon are perfectly lined up — anything less than perfection creates a partial lunar eclipse or no eclipse at all. Some understanding of simple celestial mechanics explains how lunar eclipses work.⠀

When is the next lunar eclipse?⠀

The last lunar eclipse was on July 27, 2018. It was a total lunar eclipse. Here is a schedule of upcoming lunar eclipses:⠀

Jan. 19, 2019: Total eclipse. Visible from North and South America, Europe and Africa.⠀
July 16, 2019: Partial eclipse. Visible from South America, Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia.⠀
Jan. 10, 2020: Penumbral eclipse. Visible from parts of North America, Europe, Africa, Asia and Australia.⠀
June 5, 2020: Penumbral eclipse. Visible from parts of South America, Europe, Africa, most of Asia and Australia.⠀
July 5, 2020: Penumbral eclipse. Visible from most of North America, South America, western Europe and Africa.⠀
Nov. 30, 2020: Penumbral eclipse. Visible from North America, South America, northern Europe, eastern Asia and Australia.⠀

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-via Kieth Burns (This montage of images taken by skywatcher Kieth Burns shows the Dec. 20, 2010 total lunar eclipse. The photos won a NASA contest to become an official NASA/JPL wallpaper for the public.)⠀
Text Credit: https://buff.ly/2ptMtDE via Instagram http://bit.ly/2GF3Ixy

Crater Tycho on the Moon.

Crater Tycho on the Moon.


Credit: NASA, ESA and D Ehrenreich

Distant Horizons graphic updated by Michiel S…

Distant Horizons graphic updated by Michiel Straathof

Distant Horizons graphic updated by Michiel Straathof by Mike Malaska

Via Flickr:

Distant Horizons graphic updated by Micheil Straathof to include Philae landing on Comet 67-CG. Please note all the people and organizations that have worked hard to make this image.

apod: 2018 July 28 One Night, One Telescope…

apod:

2018 July 28

One Night, One Telescope, One Camera
Image Credit & Copyright: Fernando Cabrerizo (Centro Astronomico de Tiedra)

Explanation: Taken on the same night, from the same place, with the same telescope and camera, these postcards from our Solar System are shown at the same scale to provide an interesting comparison of apparent sizes. Spanning about half a degree in planet Earth’s sky, the Moon is a stitched mosaic of six images. The others are the result of digitally stacked frames or simple single exposures, with the real distances to the objects indicated along the bottom of each insert. Most of the Solar System’s planets with their brighter moons, and Pluto were captured during the telescopic expedition, but elusive Mercury was missed because of clouds near the horizon. The International Space Station was successfully hunted, though. The night was July 21st. Telescope and camera were located at the Centro Astronomico de Tiedra Observatory in Spain.

∞ Source: apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap180728.html

teded: If you lived on the moon, you’d have to…

teded:

If you lived on the moon, you’d have to exercise for hours a day to maintain bone and muscle mass. That’s because the moon’s gravity is just one-sixth that of the Earth, and the everyday strain of working against gravity is part of what keeps our bodies healthy.

From the TED-Ed Lesson What would it be like to live on the moon? – Alex Gendler

Animation by Allen Laseter

If you want your own Moon you can get it…

If you want your own Moon you can get it here: https://jwastronomy.shop

kreuzaderny: How the Earliest Images of the M…

kreuzaderny:

How the Earliest Images of the Moon Were so Much Better than we Realised

Fifty years ago, 5 unmanned lunar orbiters circled the moon, taking
extremely high resolution photos of the surface. They were trying to
find the perfect landing site for the Apollo missions. They would be
good enough to blow up to 40 x 54ft images that the astronauts would
walk across looking for the great spot. After their use, the images were
locked away from the public, as at the time they would have revealed
the superior technology of the USA’s spy satellite cameras, which the
orbiters cameras were designed from. Instead the images from that time
were grainy and low resolution, made to be so by NASA.